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Maple Snow Cone: Sugar on Snow

Maple Snow Cone: Sugar on Snow


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Notes

Recipe courtesy of Pure Canada Maple

Ingredients

  • 4 Cups pure Canadian maple syrup
  • 4 Cups shaved ice (or snow)

Directions

Heat the maple syrup in a large saucepan over medium heat for 5 to 7 minutes, stirring occasionally. Then, lower the heat to keep the syrup warm while you divide the shaved ice between 6 to 8 bowls.

Pour the maple syrup over the top of the shaved ice, dividing it equally.

Nutritional Facts

Servings8

Calories Per Serving426

Sugar95gN/A

Carbs106g35%

Calcium175mg18%

Iron0.2mg1%

Magnesium34mg9%

Niacin (B3)0.1mg0.6%

Potassium355mg10%

Riboflavin (B2)2mg100%

Sodium19mg1%

Thiamin (B1)0.1mg6.9%

Zinc1mg7%

Have a question about the nutrition data? Let us know.

Tags


Kid’s Winter Fun: How to Make Snow Ice Cream, Snow Cones, Slushies & Sorbet from Real Snow

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DIY, kids winter activities, recipes

The earliest ice creams and snow cones were made with real snow, not machines! Make these treats this winter with your kids and create lifetime memories. Enjoy the Outdoor Life Team member, Anne shares her childhood memories of making snow foods and sharing those traditions with her kids, as well as tips and recipes for making snow cones, snow cream and snow sorbet from real snow.

“It snowed last year too: I made a snowman and my brother knocked it down and I knocked my brother down and then we had tea.”

- Dylan Thomas, A Child's Christmas in Wales -

That Dylan Thomas quote reminds me of how things were with my brother growing up.

There were times when we were the "worst enemies" and others when we were inseparable. Winter was usually more of the latter.

I remember a year when I was probably around 10 or 11 that our well froze. Because of all the snow — there was over three feet of it — it couldn't be fixed right away, and we went at least two weeks without running water. What my parents were able to do though, is bring in pots of snow and melt it for cooking.

This is also when my brother and I started to get "creative" with other things that we could do with the snow, that didn't involve melting it.

One of our favorite things to do was make a snow fort, and that year we certainly had plenty of the white stuff to do it on a grand scale. Other kids from the neighborhood joined in, and we set out to build a "snow mansion" complete with different rooms and hallways between them. And of course, we built a magnificent "snow kitchen" complete with dishes and silverware we ransacked from the house. [Oh, how I wish my parents had taken a picture, but alas, this was long before the days of smart phones and digital cameras.]

The first foods we "prepared" were pure imagination — just plain snow and pretending it was something else — but then.

I think it was my friend Tammy who got us going, sprinkling Pop Rocks on top of a bowl of snow (oh, my, were they the craze when we were kids in the 70's). We laughed when the colorful pieces of candy started popping all over the place as they made contact with the wet snow. It became a race to stir it in, and start eating it so we could hear that wonderful popping sound in our mouths.

They didn't have this flavor when I was a kid.

And then it was on!

My brother was a huge Yoo-Hoo fan, and that became our first bowl of yummy, chocolate ice cream. My first creation used Tang poured over the top to make a bright orange snow cone. Delicious! [Confession: In the 70’s we REALLY believed that the astronauts drank Tang in space, and even though I didn’t have a big sweet tooth as a kid, I would eat the dry mix by the spoonful. I almost cringe thinking about that now.]

For two weeks, the tedious task of walking to and from our neighbor's house carrying jugs of water wasn't so bad because we knew that as soon as the chore was finished, we were free to go and play. My brother, friends and I took turns creating new "recipes" with drinks and candies that we had on hand.

This is one of those childhood memories that I will never forget.

Decades later, when I had my own children, you can be sure I shared the story — and the fun with them. For a good part of their lives I was a single mother, so funds were tight, but making sweet treats and playing in the snow were cheap and fun things to do when school was out for holidays or bad weather.

My boys are both grown now, but I can still remember their smiles of joy, as they tasted their delicious creations, each adding their own favorite twist.

For my oldest, it was usually a Gatorade snow cone, but the younger preferred chocolate snow ice cream made with Hershey’s syrup and milk. I like to think that these times will be memories that they cherish too, and a tradition they will share when they have children of their own!

I hope you enjoy the recipes for making your own sweet treats that I am going to share.

But my real wish is that through the ideas for creating tasty foods with snow, you create some cherished memories with your kids — and perhaps reminisce back to your own childhood along the way.


5 Ways to Eat Fresh Snow

Embrace the next blizzard with these five frosty treats that come together with the help of freshly fallen snow.

Related To:

Photo By: Renee Comet ©2015, Television Food Network, G.P. All Rights Reserved

Photo By: Renee Comet ©2015, Television Food Network, G.P. All Rights Reserved

Photo By: Renee Comet ©2015, Television Food Network, G.P. All Rights Reserved

Photo By: Renee Comet ©2015, Television Food Network, G.P. All Rights Reserved

Photo By: Renee Comet ©2015, Television Food Network, G.P. All Rights Reserved

Photo By: Renee Comet ©2015, Television Food Network, G.P. All Rights Reserved

Treats with a Wintry Twist

Eating freshly fallen snow is part of the glory of childhood snow days, up there with sledding and snowball fights. For adults, snowstorms aren't quite as fun as they used to be. So why not embrace them and eat some snow treats? We can't promise that all snow is safe for eating, so use your best judgment. If the stuff accumulating outside your window isn't fresh and clean, you can always make shaved ice and apply these frosty ideas any time of year.

From Food Network Kitchen

Maple Snow Cone

A winter version of a refreshing summer favorite. Scoop fresh snow into a paper cup or cone. Drizzle with pure maple syrup to taste. Add a splash of bourbon for an adult version.

Twice-Frozen Snow Pops

These are a fun and easy winter treat. Stir a few tablespoons of your favorite thawed juice concentrate into fresh snow. Spoon and pack into frozen pop molds and freeze until solid. Run the outside of the molds under warm water to help unmold.

Snow Halo Halo

A Southeast Asian dessert whose name translates into "mix mix," so it's "everything but the kitchen sink." Dress up snow at home and make your own version of halo halo. Pack a parfait glass about 3/4 of the way full with fresh snow. Drizzle with evaporated milk to taste. Top with a scoop of vanilla or black raspberry ice cream (to mimic the traditional purple yam kind). Decorate with chopped fresh fruit, like pineapple or mango, large tapioca pearls, toasted coconut and your favorite crunchy cereal (the fruited kind is fun!). Dig in.

Snow-fogato

Affogato is a simple Italian dessert where espresso is poured over ice cream. Use snow as a stand-in. Pack together fresh snow to make a tight snowball about the size of a baseball. Put in a large coffee cup. Pour in sweetened condensed milk and then strong coffee. Top with whipped cream and chocolate shavings and eat quickly!

Slushy Snow Mimosa

Harvest some fresh snow and then go inside (where it's warm) to cheers over a winter brunch with friends and family. Fill a champagne flute with fresh snow. Pour in chilled apricot nectar or orange juice and Champagne or Prosecco.


Snow Day Recipes: How To Make Freshly-Fallen Snow Treats

Yes, sigh, another winter storm is dumping epic amounts of snow all over the East Coast this week.

While the slow-moving weather system is bound to cause huge traffic delays, slippery sidewalks and post-shoveling muscle aches, it’s also bringing something we can actually look forward to: Snow treats.

All you need is a few handfuls of freshly fallen snow and some ingredients from the pantry, and you and your kids can turn a bad winter storm into a sweet snow day. We’re talking sweet snow creams, maple-snow candies and real snow cones.

Disclaimer: These recipes are all null and void in case of yellow snow. (Because, seriously. Yuck.)

SNOW CREAM (Makes 4)
While it’s still snowing, place a large mixing bowl outside to collect the fresh flakes. When the bowl is full (or you’ve gathered about 8 cups of snow), stir in ½ cup sugar and 1½ tsp. vanilla extract (or to taste). Stir in about 1 cup milk, until you’ve reached the desired consistency.

MAPLE SNOW CANDY (Makes about 8)

1. While it’s still snowing, place a clean baking sheet or cookie sheet outside to collect the fresh flakes. When the sheet is full, pack down the snow and allow it to fill up again. Pack down one more time.

2. In a small saucepan, heat 1 cup of real maple syrup over medium heat until it boils (or a candy thermometer reads between 235F and 245F).

3. Take the pan off the heat and drizzle the syrup over the packed snow in long strips. Let the syrup strips cool and become firm for 3 to 5 seconds. Pull the candy strips out of the snow, and eat while still a little warm.


Preparing your snow to make snow candy

If you’ll be making your candy outdoors, pack down an area of snow. You want this area to be very firm so it holds the hot syrup. Alternatively, you could fill a platter or a baking sheet with a layer of packed down snow.

Obviously, if you’re working inside, like we were, you’ll need to use the platter or baking sheet.


Canadian Maple Syrup Taffy Candy: An Eastern Canadian Tradition

Maple Syrup Taffy Candy is the quintessential Canadian sweet. In March of 2010, I visited my first Sugar Shack, or Cabane a Sucre, in Quebec when I was there for the Slow Food National Conference in the Valle de la Batiscan. As it is when attending such conferences, only the best of the best is show cased. Sucrerie Jean-Louis Massicotte et filles, in operation since 1710 still harvesting syrup in the traditional fashion with horse drawn wagons (or via snowshoes) and pouring it into aged oak barrels was the Cabane a Sucre we enjoyed the traditional Sugar Shack lunch at. It is in the neighbouring areaof Mauricie, is the oldest traditionally harvested syrup cabane a sucre and listed as one of the 5 best sugar shack experiences in Quebec. The entire experience resonated deep into my Canadian soul and this baptism served as an authentic and missing key into my own cultural identity. 10th generation proprioter Gaétan Massicotte took great pride in pouring his previous boiled maple syrup into a bed of fresh snow outside after the celebratory experience leaving each guest savoring the sweetness of the cold Spring with a stick of Canadian Maple Syrup Taffy Candy. My first. Ever.

It was such an honor, almost surreal, as yearning to be outside in the snow making Canadian Maple Syrup Taffy Candy as I had seen children do in my grade one Reader in Elementary School had been a deep seated desire. Here I was participating in this ritual this Spring of 2010 no longer with the young body of a child bounding through the snow under leafless Maple trees in the woods as those in my Elementary Reader, yet with the heart of that child revering the sweetness of this water-like sap exponentially distilled into iconic Canadiana.

I am Canadian, have been all of my life, and had never had Canadian Maple Syrup Taffy Candy! I had never had poutine until this trip, either. Keep in mind, this was 2010. Poutine as just rearing it&rsquos head out of Quebec and Eastern Canada. It can now be found in every major Canadian city from coast to coast. Not then. And Maple Syrup Taffy Candy? The flavour was reminiscent of a Halloween Taffy Kiss from my childhood. Not the molasses taffy kiss from Kerr&rsquos, but the other one. Possibly the &ldquoOriginal Halloween Kiss&rdquo manufactured in Quebec, but as I cannot find the ingredient list anywhere, hard to say that is the one, yet it could well be.

It wasn&rsquot until Brandon from Rolling Desserts connected with me to work with him regarding the launch of his Rolling Desserts Ice Plate that I learned how to make Canadian Maple Syrup Taffy Candy at home. Seriously. His ice plate makes it possible to make Canadian Maple Syrup Taffy Candy during the summer months, and particularly as celebratory confection for Canada Day! During the process of learning how to make it and practicing for the work I was doing for him, I learned how simple it was to do it anywhere by anyone living in Canada during the winter. Of course, you have to buy your maple syrup and rarely in the West, do we know a manufacturer personally.

There is a fellow at the Callingwood Market in Edmonton who sells great jugs of the syrup from his parents farm in Quebec and that is what I used to make my homemade Canadian Maple Syrup Taffy Candy! Below, and enlargement from the back of the jug!

Canadian Maple Syrup Taffy Candy: Boiling the Syrup

I just so happen to have the perfect little heat conducting copper pot that I indulged myself in a few years ago for caramel making. One cup of Syrup will make enough Canadian Maple Syrup Taffy Candy for 8-12 people. Did you know that one cup of Canadian Maple Syrup takes 40 cups of Canadian Maple Tree Sap? That&rsquos why it is so expensive: it takes 40 gallons of sap to make one gallon of syrup. To make the Canadian Maple Syrup Taffy Candy, it is cooked just past the soft ball stage.

I never trust any of my candy thermometers. Experience. Have had too many recipes go awry due to improperly calibrated thermometers. Who knows how to calibrate a home thermometer? Help? So, I always try to have three on hand. I use 2 and if one falters, have another to rely upon.

The syrup must boil to 235ºF and though this little pot was less than 1/4 full with one cup of the syrup, it would most definitely boil over (and did the first time) had I not been stirring rigorously. Definitely be sure to stir the boiling pot to avoid more syrup on the stove top than in your pot!

Moderating the heat is important, but the heat must be at medium high to get the syrup to the soft ball stage (235ºF).

It can literally boil over in the blink of an eye. That golden hue on the stove top is not the sunlight.

Once the syrup reaches temperature, and it really doesn&rsquot take long when boiling only 1 cup, turn the heat off immediately and set it aside to cool. Bubbles will disappear very quickly. At this point, there is no rush. Your syrup is ready to make Canadian Maple Syrup Taffy Candy. How easy is that. I truly had no idea. More to the point, had never investigated the process simply believing it to be too complicated.

Canadian Maple Syrup Taffy Candy: Pouring the Syrup on the Snow

WARNING: This syrup is dangerously hot and can remove skin off your body as it will burn you very badly should there be a mishap. Therefore, best to use protective gloves, explain the danger to any little ones, and have them stand on the other side of the snow from where you are pouring to watch the syrup turn to taffy when it hits the snow.

As soon as you pour a thick ribbon of syrup onto the snow, it will start to harden, so quickly demonstrate how to place a stick on it and twist the yet sticky top onto the stick, and roll the taffy up around it.

This is the part that must be done rather quickly, or the eager guests will be enjoying flat ribbons of Canadian Maple Syrup Taffy Candy instead of candy pops.

In the city, the snow crystals may not add the gorgeous natural freshness to the experience they do in Maple Syrup country.

Canadian Maple Syrup Taffy Candy: Eating the Maple Syrup Taffy Candy

The snow crystals are magic and give way to that fundamental Canadian maple candy flavor that is truly unique when made with real Canadian Maple Syrup. However, do be careful if you are in a heavily polluted area. Might be best to rinse them before the first taste, if so.

The pleasure is not short lived. The small little knob of golden taffy will last for a considerable time particularly when outdoors in the cold. Inside, it has only been boiled to the soft ball stage, so will melt a bit faster and be quite loose within a warm room.

How can you beat that? My first experience was life changing and now this bit of Canadiana can be made at home from coast to coast! Of course, there will not be the celebratory experience there is in the Spring in the communities that harvest and produce this liquid gold. There will not be the sleigh rides, or the sap sipping straight from the trees&hellip There will not be the comradery or the knowing that comes with such traditions over hundreds of years, but there will be a shared traditional Canadian experience that will harken deep within each and find its way to that cultural core we call home. Ah! Yes. A fundamental taste of our home. Only in Canada you say? Yes, indeed.


Snow Cone Syrup - 3 Flavors

Ingredients

For Strawberry Snow Cone Syrup

  • 1 pound fresh or frozen strawberries (organic is best)
  • 1 cup sugar See section on using other sweeteners.
  • 1 cup water

For Mango Snow Cone Syrup

  • 2 ripe mangos, peeled and diced
  • 3/4 cup sugar
  • 1 cup water
  • 1 tsp vanilla extract (I use this homemade vanilla) Optional

For Kiwi Snow Cone Syrup

  • 3 cups kiwi, peeled and diced
  • 1/4 cup fresh spinach leaves (for color)
  • 1 cup sugar
  • 1 cup water

Instructions

Homemade Snow Cone Syrup Troubleshooting and FAQ

CAN I USE SOMETHING OTHER THAN SUGAR TO SWEETEN MY SNOW CONE SYRUP?
Absolutely! Any natural sweetener will work for this recipe honey, maple syrup, agave, coconut sugar, and so on.

The only exception are natural sweeteners like stevia and xylitol. They will not thicken as the sauce cooks, so your snow cone syrup will be a more watery consistency.

WHY DIDN'T MY SNOW CONE SYRUP THICKEN?
There are two possible reasons..

1. You used a sweetener that doesn't thicken when reduced, such as stevia or xylitol.

2. The snow cone syrup simply didn't boil long enough to reduce and thicken. Reheat the syrup and bring to a boil, then continue to boil over medium heat until syrup thickens.

HOW LONG DOES HOMEMADE SNOW CONE SYRUP LAST IN THE FRIDGE?
This syrup is basically a jam that's been watered down, so you can treat it the same way you would a homemade jam. For us, that's about 2 months in the fridge, but I doubt yours will last that long!

HOW MUCH SYRUP DOES ONE BATCH MAKE?
Resulting quantity will vary based on how long you boil the syrup and how thick you like your snow cone syrup to be. However, in general 1 batch of any of the recipes will make about 2 cups of syrup.

HOW MANY SNOW CONES WILL 1 RECIPE COVER?
10-30 snow cones can be made per syrup batch, depending on the size of the snow cones in question. We usually use about 1-2 tablespoons per cup of shaved ice.


How to Make Maple Snow Candy and Other Delicious Snow Recipes for Winter Storm Jonas

In a famous excerpt from the Little House on The Prairie book series, Laura and Mary were taught by Ma and Pa how to make delicious maple syrup taffy using fresh snow. Though news of snowflakes harboring microscopic pollutants from car exhaust is tainting the childhoods of snow-tasting Americans everywhere, the treat is still a popular d elicatessen to make during winter storms like the one currently barreling toward the Northeast.

In fact, there are several winter treats to be made using snow as the main ingredient. But be warned, eating them might not be the healthiest idea if the snow comes from a city area or near roadways. For everyone who can manage to scrape together a few bowls of the precious, untouched gift from the heavens, check out these recipes for some chilly delights:

Maple snow candy

According to the 1979 Little House Cookbook, making maple snow candy is pretty simple: You will need a cup of molasses, a half cup of brown sugar and plenty of clean snow.

Mix the molasses and brown sugar in a nonstick saucepan and bring the two ingredients to a boil. Stir the mix every so often, until the combination reaches 245 degrees Fahrenheit (use a candy thermostat to measure the temperature).

G ently p our the mixture over a heaping serving of snow spread over wax paper. The snow and mixture will almost immediately solidify, making a delicious treat. Dry the candy with paper towels and enjoy!

Maple snow popsicles

The Canadian version of Little House on the Prairie's maple snow candy is just as delicious, and even easier to make than the previous recipe. All you will need is your favorite maple syrup and popsicle sticks, available at most grocery stores.

Nothing says winter in Québec City like boiled maple syrup poured onto fresh snow and roll. http://ift.tt/1UA9CvK pic.twitter.com/tYwstwpTqb

https://pbs.twimg.com/media/CYJRh0LWMAA8YUU.jpg:large

Lay out the popsicle sticks in a straight line in a slate of fresh snow. Drizzle the maple syrup in generous portions over each of the sticks.

Give the maple syrup sticks a few minutes to freeze with the sugary goodness and snowflakes before lifting them from the s late . In almost no time, you've created a delicious spread to enjoy in pure Canadian fashion: by pouring maple syrup on just about anything.

Coconut maple snow cream

TreeHugger has the perfect recipe for vegans looking to mix the Earth's finest flakes with coconut goodness. Allow a can of coconut milk to chill in a mound of snow (or the freezer) for at least thirty minutes before opening it and shaving off the top — unless you're into that.

Afterward, combine the contents of the can with 8 cups of snow and 2 tablespoons of maple syrup in a large bowl. Voila!

This specific dish could also go great with a few ounces of rum, replicating the Puerto Rican coquitos pictured above.

Spiked snow cones

What better excuse to drink alcohol that's been on the ground than in the midst of a catastrophic snow storm?

The best part of spiked snow cones is that they can be as simple or complex as your taste buds desire. Simply fill up a cup with snow and top it off with an ounce of whiskey, vodka or rum. Add a bit of flavor to make the drink go down smooth. Fresh orange, lemon or lime squeeze will compliment this beverage perfectly.

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Top Kremlin Pundits Celebrate Mid-Air Takedown of Journo Facing Execution

PETRAS MALUKAS/AFP via Getty ImagesAs many around the world gasped over the outrage taking place in Belarus—where authorities forced down a passenger jet in order to arrest a journalist—pro-Kremlin propagandists were nothing short of delighted about the incident, rejoicing and celebrating in Moscow.On Sunday, Belarusian authorities ordered a Ryanair flight that took off from Athens to land in Minsk under false pretenses—a mere pretext to arrest a journalist on board. Roman Protasevich faces the death penalty after being placed on a “terrorist” list for his reporting on police brutality during anti-government protests in Belarus last year.“Never thought I’d be jealous of Belarus for any reason. But now I’m jealous. Well done, Batka,” tweeted Margarita Simonyan, the head of Russian state-sponsored news outlets RT and Sputnik, using the nickname for Belarusian President Alexander Lukashenko.Journalist Snatched from Flight Faces Belarus ‘Death Penalty’Appearing on the state TV show Sunday Evening with Vladimir Soloviev, Simonyan doubled down on her support for the actions of the Belarusian dictator. “That was brazen. Great job. That’s how it ought to be done. I, for one, support such measures.” In response to media inquiries, Simonyan tweeted a poem that seemed to suggest the journalist “had it coming.”As for the method used to apprehend Protasevich, state TV experts said they’re shocked not by Lukashenko’s tactics—which they described as perfectly normal—but by the reactions from the West.Speaking on the Russian state TV show 60 Minutes, political scientist Vladimir Kornilov suggested, “Let's dispatch our Snowden to Cuba for a vacation and see what happens then.” Likewise, Russia’s Foreign Ministry spokeswoman Maria Zakharova claimed to be “shocked” not by Lukashenko’s actions, but instead by what she described as “Western hypocrisy” in this regard.Yury Afonin, a member of the State Duma for the Russian Federation, said on 60 Minutes, “Any traitor to their country—and Protasevich is a traitor and terrorist—will be held accountable. It’s unavoidable.” On another show, political scientist Sergey Mikheyev suggested that Russia could learn a thing or two from the Ryanair incident. “[Lukashenko] created an important precedent for us to follow in dealing with such people.”RT’s Simonyan was excited that the opposition journalist was captured in such a brazen manner. Perhaps unsurprisingly so, given that she is one of the most vocal proponents of the idea that Russia should ban any media that isn’t owned or controlled by the government.On the state media talk show The Right to Know in February, Simonyan said, “All resources and instruments that could be used to influence or alter the mentality of the masses and the mood of society need to be owned by us, by our country.” She added: “The West is in a state of war with Russia—a sanction war at the minimum, information war, hybrid war, etcetera. And yet they’re funding everything tied to the opposition. Should we close down everything Western? Yes, I think so.”To erase any notion of adherence to democratic values, Simonyan clarified: “Why would I see danger in limiting the freedom of speech when I don’t believe in freedom of speech?”During the state media talk show The Evening with Vladimir Soloviev in March, Simonyan urged, “We must cut anyone who is working for their [Western] money out of Russian political life. Everyone. It has to be forbidden through legislation. Do you want to be in politics or media—and media is the same thing as politics—you can’t do that if you’re receiving even one dollar from over there.” At the same time, Simonyan is adamant that Russian state-funded RT and Sputnik should be able to freely function in Western countries.Russia State Media Gears Up for a War ‘Against the West’Russian President Vladimir Putin isn’t far behind Lukashenko in his quest to silence dissent and eliminate any media coverage that dares to question his authoritarian rule. He falsely claims that Russia’s very survival is in peril, as the West is allegedly scheming to destroy the nation by removing him from his otherwise unending presidency through nefarious means.The Kremlin’s extensive propaganda apparatus is dedicated to painting the United States as a relentless, omnipresent foe. On state-funded media outlet Sputnik this month, Russian Foreign Ministry Spokeswoman Maria Zakharova asserted that the internet as a whole is secretly controlled by the U.S. government.“It’s a scary snake pit,” Zakharova exclaimed, describing the world wide web as a tool of hybrid warfare used to interfere in the affairs of sovereign nations. The Russian government’s intent to separate the country’s internet from the rest of the world is being portrayed to average Russians as a set of measures that are being implemented for their own good, as opposed to the real beneficiary: Russian President Vladimir Putin.The only solution that is being proposed by the Kremlin to the Russian people is the systematic elimination of the internal opposition, along with getting rid of the foreign media operating within Russia’s borders, and the eventual creation of the “sovereign internet,” which would operate separately from the world wide web. The Kremlin’s propagandists are working overtime to convince the citizens that what they really want is less freedom, more oppression, no plurality in media, and no change in power. In other words, a surefire formula to ensure that Putin remains president for life.On Sunday Evening with Vladimir Soloviev in March, RT’s Simonyan made an Orwellian claim that the Russian people are not suffering from lack of freedom but are instead unhappy with excessive freedoms being afforded by the government—and should be glad to give them up for the good of the country. On The Evening with Vladimir Soloviev last Tuesday, Russian lawmaker Oleg Morozov advocated arresting people left and right, with no regard for what the West might say or do about it. “There is a war of annihilation being waged against my country,” Morozov claimed, as he urged authorities to crack down on the opposition to prevent an uprising.Girlfriend of Belarusian Activist Also Snatched From Hijacked Commercial FlightWhile opposition leader Alexei Navalny languishes in prison, state media personalities are claiming that the Russians want Putin’s opponents to be crushed in a more violent manner. During his nightly broadcast last Tuesday, state media host Soloviev claimed, “Our liberals are pushing the country back to 1937 [Stalin’s year of terror], which would be welcomed by a sizable segment of the population. It could get very bloody.” This message is meant not only to feed the worst instincts of the public but also to deter any internal opposition, while the external influence is systematically uprooted.Describing the effect of the Foreign Agent Registration Act (FARA), Simonyan claimed last year that RT’s U.S.-based reporters are being “subjected to horrific pressure from their media, their names are being published, they are being shamed, influence is being exerted upon their friends and their family.” She shamelessly contended, “No normal person could possibly like a monopoly in media. That kind of monopoly leads to fallacies and mistakes. And when the matter at hand pertains to geopolitics and the world order, fallacies and mistakes can be deadly.”As Roman Protasevich likely faces torture at the hands of Lukashenko's regime, Russian state TV hosts and experts pointed out with cruel glee that he will be forced to provide information about supposedly being funded by Western intelligence agencies, further enforcing the illusion that anyone who dares to question the government is a foreign-funded “traitor.”Read more at The Daily Beast.Get our top stories in your inbox every day. Sign up now!Daily Beast Membership: Beast Inside goes deeper on the stories that matter to you. Learn more.

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How to Make Maple Snow Candy and Other Delicious Snow Recipes for Winter Storm Jonas

In a famous excerpt from the Little House on The Prairie book series, Laura and Mary were taught by Ma and Pa how to make delicious maple syrup taffy using fresh snow. Though news of snowflakes harboring microscopic pollutants from car exhaust is tainting the childhoods of snow-tasting Americans everywhere, the treat is still a popular delicatessen to make during winter storms like the one currently barreling toward the Northeast.

In fact, there are several winter treats to be made using snow as the main ingredient. But be warned, eating them might not be the healthiest idea if the snow comes from a city area or near roadways. For everyone who can manage to scrape together a few bowls of the precious, untouched gift from the heavens, check out these recipes for some chilly delights:

Maple snow candy

According to the 1979 Little House Cookbook, making maple snow candy is pretty simple: You will need a cup of molasses, a half cup of brown sugar and plenty of clean snow.

Mix the molasses and brown sugar in a nonstick saucepan and bring the two ingredients to a boil. Stir the mix every so often, until the combination reaches 245 degrees Fahrenheit (use a candy thermostat to measure the temperature).

Gently pour the mixture over a heaping serving of snow spread over wax paper. The snow and mixture will almost immediately solidify, making a delicious treat. Dry the candy with paper towels and enjoy!

Maple snow popsicles

The Canadian version of Little House on the Prairie's maple snow candy is just as delicious, and even easier to make than the previous recipe. All you will need is your favorite maple syrup and popsicle sticks, available at most grocery stores.

Lay out the popsicle sticks in a straight line in a slate of fresh snow. Drizzle the maple syrup in generous portions over each of the sticks.

Give the maple syrup sticks a few minutes to freeze with the sugary goodness and snowflakes before lifting them from the slate. In almost no time, you've created a delicious spread to enjoy in pure Canadian fashion: by pouring maple syrup on just about anything.

Coconut maple snow cream

TreeHugger has the perfect recipe for vegans looking to mix the Earth's finest flakes with coconut goodness. Allow a can of coconut milk to chill in a mound of snow (or the freezer) for at least thirty minutes before opening it and shaving off the top — unless you're into that.

Afterward, combine the contents of the can with 8 cups of snow and 2 tablespoons of maple syrup in a large bowl. Voila!

This specific dish could also go great with a few ounces of rum, replicating the Puerto Rican coquitos pictured above.

Spiked snow cones

What better excuse to drink alcohol that's been on the ground than in the midst of a catastrophic snow storm?

The best part of spiked snow cones is that they can be as simple or complex as your taste buds desire. Simply fill up a cup with snow and top it off with an ounce of whiskey, vodka or rum. Add a bit of flavor to make the drink go down smooth. Fresh orange, lemon or lime squeeze will compliment this beverage perfectly.


Instructions

  1. Sort out your snow. If you’ve got a pristine patch of freshly-fallen white stuff sitting pretty on your patio, you can just make your candy right there. You want to make sure you’ve got plenty of clearance between the snow you’ll be pouring molten sugar on and anything you don’t want to eat—like dog pee or dirt. So unless you feel confident that a cubic six inches or so of snow in your yard is clean (and going to stay that way for the next ten minutes) just pack some into a pan and stick it in your freezer for safe keeping.
  2. Get yourself some quality syrup. The genuine maple article, if you please. This is important: If you use the fake stuff—which is just corn syrup in disguise—you’ll end up with a gooey, artificially-flavored mess.
  3. Put a cup of the syrup (or more! or less! the world is your single-ingredient-recipe oyster) in a small saucepan. If you’ve got a pot that’s good for pouring—one with a nice handle, and maybe even a spout—now is the time to use it.
  4. Place your pot on the stove on medium-high heat. Bring that baby to a boil. Stir it frequently to keep it from bubbling over or burning.
  5. Let your maple syrup hit the “soft-ball stage.” This refers to the behavior it will exhibit as it cools down: the molten liquid will form a soft, flexible ball when it hits cold water. If you’ve got a candy thermometer handy, 235°F is the magic number. Alternatively, you can do a practical test by dabbing droplets of boiling syrup into cold water and then seeing how squishy they are. Or, if you’re feeling lazy, just set a timer for four minutes—your sugar should be pretty much where you want it to be after around four to five minutes of boiling.
  6. Before the syrup has a chance to cool, pour it onto a layer of packed snow. If you want your candy to come in the form of snowy lollipops, lay some popsicle sticks out first and pour the syrup back and forth along the top third of the sticks. Otherwise, just drizzle your syrup across the whole surface of your snowpack and double back as needed. It should start to cool immediately.
  7. Let the candy cool down. Once the strips are hard enough to pick up, do so—and eat them immediately. And don’t forget to brush your teeth after. Tell your dentist we’re sorry.

This article was originally published on March 22, 2018. It has been updated.

Rachel Feltmanis the Executive Editor of Popular Science and the host of the podcast The Weirdest Thing I Learned This Week. She's an alum of Simon's Rock and NYU's Science, Health, and Environmental Reporting program. Rachel previously worked at Quartz and The Washington Post. Contact the author here.


Watch the video: How To Make Maple Sugar On Snow (June 2022).