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The Ultimate Grilling Giveaway!

The Ultimate Grilling Giveaway!


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Enter to win these fantastic tools and gadgets from Cobb Grills

We're continuing our awesome summer cookout contest with three brand new items that you can win!

What We're Giving Away: Premier Stainless Steel Portable Grill (with carrying bag), Fenced Roasting Rack, and a Cobb-On-the-Go Cookbook. (Yes, all of them for one lucky winner!)

What You Have to Do: Submit your favorite grilling recipe for summer parties.

How: Upload your recipe here, and email us the link at [email protected]

Contest Dates: June 13th to June 22nd at 6 p.m.

Winner Announced: Thursday, June 23rd.

We'll pick the best recipe and send the winner all of the fabulous prizes listed above. Enter now for a shot at winning!

To kick-off summer the best way we know how, The Daily Meal has paired up with Cobb Grills for the Ultimate Grilling Giveaway! Named invention of the year in 2001 by Time Magazine, this completely portable grill is perfect for grilling in the backyard and can sit on any tabletop, thanks to its stay-cool base. It’s efficient, using only eight briquettes for three hours of heat, and is safe for use in windier environments. Plus, thanks to its unique design, any fat dripping from the meat is collected away from the flame, resulting in food that isn’t cloaked in smoke when cooked (and leaner than if it were seared in a pan).

See the Cobb in action with this leg of lamb recipe — it’s also great for grilling a whole roast chicken. Then read our tips for hosting your own meal-from-the-grill, backyard dinner party.


BBQ 101: How to Grill for Total Beginners

Even if we can’t end up throwing our usual Labor Day BBQ bash this year, we’re absolutely getting out in the yard (or on the patio) and grilling as much as we can before the weather turns. If you’re raring to go too but are new to the whole grilling thing, don’t worry—I’ll help you out with BBQ tips for this coming summer and beyond.

Before I proceed, I want to provide a bit of a disclaimer. Grilling, like all cooking, can be dangerous if you’re not comfortable with what you’re doing. When in doubt, consult your grill’s manual and always heed any safety warnings. While I can provide general advice based on my own grilling experience, I cannot speak to your particular equipment. Please be careful, and exercise caution when using a grill.

Identify Your Grill Type

BBQ Battle Gas vs Charcoal: Which Is Best? Hopefully I didn’t scare you off! I just want to make sure everyone is safe. If you’re still with me, the first thing to figure out is what type of grill you have access to. Typically, you’re dealing with gas, propane, electric, or charcoal. Curious about which one you have? The simplest one to identify is the electric grill. Why? Because they have cords that need to be plugged into outlets. If you have a grill that has a cord, you have an electric grill. Confident you don’t have an electric grill? Try looking beneath your grilling unit. If you see a tank, you likely have a propane grill. Don’t see a cord or a tank? Check the grill face. Do you see knobs and buttons? Then you probably have a gas grill. Different from the propane grill, these tap into your house’s natural gas supply, so you don’t have to worry about running out of cooking fuel like you do with propane. Lastly, if your grill is super basic—no knobs, no buttons—and looks like a hollowed-out drum, you likely have a charcoal grill.

In the market for a new grill? Check out CNET’s Best Grills for 2020.

Properly Prep Your Grill: Clean and Season

Once you figure out what kind of grill you have, you can start to prep it. The first step to any great grilling experience is to ensure your grill is clean. For steel or cast iron (non-coated) grates, use a stiff bristled steel brush to get any gunk, grime, or rust off. For porcelain-coated (or other non-stick coated) cast iron, use a nylon bristled brush to avoid scratching. Your grill may actually have a special tool that fits the contours of the grates. If it does, use that. Next, make sure the bottom of the grill is clear of any debris. Sometimes, things can get stuck and block the heat source. This is particularly common with charcoal grills as ash and coals from the last grill session could be left inside. Check out CNET’s guide on How to Clean Your Grill for more pointers.

GrillArt Grill Brush and Scraper, $19.50 from Amazon

Get that grill squeaky-clean.

Next, it’s time to season your grill grates (Note: Pre-seasoned, or porcelain/coated grates don’t need seasoning). This step helps create a non-stick cooking surface. Apply a thin, even layer of canola oil to the grates before turning on the heat. In my experience, the best way is to use something like Pam and spray it on, then wipe away any excess with a paper towel. Remember: A thin, even layer is what you’re going for. Too much oil will burn and create a buildup you don’t want!

Turn Up the Heat!

Now that your grill is clean and seasoned, you’ll have to ensure the fuel source is good to go. For gas grills, you need to make sure the valve on your gas line that allows gas to flow to your grill is open. Similarly, for propane grills, the top of the propane tank (underneath the grill) has a valve that needs to be opened (turned counterclockwise) to allow the propane to flow to the grill. For electric grills, just find an outlet, and plug it in. Finally, for charcoal grills, you need to add charcoal to the bottom of the grill (under the grate).

At this point, it’s time to preheat the grill. Just think about it like preheating an oven. Now, there are a lot of different grills out there, so your best bet is to find your grill’s manual and follow the instructions for starting it. A lot of manuals can even be found online nowadays. That being said, here are the basics.

How to Start an Electric Grill

Electric grills will typically have a knob to turn the grill on, and adjust the heat setting. If you have an electric grill, turn that knob to high, close the lid, and wait for your grill to reach your preferred cooking temperature. Unfortunately, it could take a while. Just be patient.

How to Start a Propane or Gas Grill

Propane and gas grills are similar, but a little more tricky. They have knobs too, but they also have ignitor buttons. The knobs let gas flow freely from the tank to the burners, and the ignitor button creates a spark that lights the flame you’ll use to cook with. For propane and gas grills, you’ll likely need to turn at least one of the knobs (each knob corresponds to a burner) to high. Once on high, you’ll press and hold the ignitor button. You should hear a clicking followed by a whoosh (the gas igniting). Once you hear that whoosh, or see a flame, you can release the ignitor button. Keep the temperature on high, and fire up any other burners you plan to use. Additionally, close the lid and leave the grill for 10-15 minutes, or until your desired temperature is achieved.

How to Start a Charcoal Grill

Charcoal is going to be the most different. If you’re using coals deemed “match light” (check the bag), you should be able to simply light them with a match. Otherwise, you’ll need to add some lighter fluid to your coals before you introduce a flame. It’s important to heed any warnings on the charcoal and the lighter fluid when lighting your charcoal grill. Don’t use too much lighter fluid, and light your coals immediately after applying the fluid to them. Once the coals have a light gray ash to them, they’re ready to be spread around, and you’re ready to cook.


BBQ 101: How to Grill for Total Beginners

Even if we can’t end up throwing our usual Labor Day BBQ bash this year, we’re absolutely getting out in the yard (or on the patio) and grilling as much as we can before the weather turns. If you’re raring to go too but are new to the whole grilling thing, don’t worry—I’ll help you out with BBQ tips for this coming summer and beyond.

Before I proceed, I want to provide a bit of a disclaimer. Grilling, like all cooking, can be dangerous if you’re not comfortable with what you’re doing. When in doubt, consult your grill’s manual and always heed any safety warnings. While I can provide general advice based on my own grilling experience, I cannot speak to your particular equipment. Please be careful, and exercise caution when using a grill.

Identify Your Grill Type

BBQ Battle Gas vs Charcoal: Which Is Best? Hopefully I didn’t scare you off! I just want to make sure everyone is safe. If you’re still with me, the first thing to figure out is what type of grill you have access to. Typically, you’re dealing with gas, propane, electric, or charcoal. Curious about which one you have? The simplest one to identify is the electric grill. Why? Because they have cords that need to be plugged into outlets. If you have a grill that has a cord, you have an electric grill. Confident you don’t have an electric grill? Try looking beneath your grilling unit. If you see a tank, you likely have a propane grill. Don’t see a cord or a tank? Check the grill face. Do you see knobs and buttons? Then you probably have a gas grill. Different from the propane grill, these tap into your house’s natural gas supply, so you don’t have to worry about running out of cooking fuel like you do with propane. Lastly, if your grill is super basic—no knobs, no buttons—and looks like a hollowed-out drum, you likely have a charcoal grill.

In the market for a new grill? Check out CNET’s Best Grills for 2020.

Properly Prep Your Grill: Clean and Season

Once you figure out what kind of grill you have, you can start to prep it. The first step to any great grilling experience is to ensure your grill is clean. For steel or cast iron (non-coated) grates, use a stiff bristled steel brush to get any gunk, grime, or rust off. For porcelain-coated (or other non-stick coated) cast iron, use a nylon bristled brush to avoid scratching. Your grill may actually have a special tool that fits the contours of the grates. If it does, use that. Next, make sure the bottom of the grill is clear of any debris. Sometimes, things can get stuck and block the heat source. This is particularly common with charcoal grills as ash and coals from the last grill session could be left inside. Check out CNET’s guide on How to Clean Your Grill for more pointers.

GrillArt Grill Brush and Scraper, $19.50 from Amazon

Get that grill squeaky-clean.

Next, it’s time to season your grill grates (Note: Pre-seasoned, or porcelain/coated grates don’t need seasoning). This step helps create a non-stick cooking surface. Apply a thin, even layer of canola oil to the grates before turning on the heat. In my experience, the best way is to use something like Pam and spray it on, then wipe away any excess with a paper towel. Remember: A thin, even layer is what you’re going for. Too much oil will burn and create a buildup you don’t want!

Turn Up the Heat!

Now that your grill is clean and seasoned, you’ll have to ensure the fuel source is good to go. For gas grills, you need to make sure the valve on your gas line that allows gas to flow to your grill is open. Similarly, for propane grills, the top of the propane tank (underneath the grill) has a valve that needs to be opened (turned counterclockwise) to allow the propane to flow to the grill. For electric grills, just find an outlet, and plug it in. Finally, for charcoal grills, you need to add charcoal to the bottom of the grill (under the grate).

At this point, it’s time to preheat the grill. Just think about it like preheating an oven. Now, there are a lot of different grills out there, so your best bet is to find your grill’s manual and follow the instructions for starting it. A lot of manuals can even be found online nowadays. That being said, here are the basics.

How to Start an Electric Grill

Electric grills will typically have a knob to turn the grill on, and adjust the heat setting. If you have an electric grill, turn that knob to high, close the lid, and wait for your grill to reach your preferred cooking temperature. Unfortunately, it could take a while. Just be patient.

How to Start a Propane or Gas Grill

Propane and gas grills are similar, but a little more tricky. They have knobs too, but they also have ignitor buttons. The knobs let gas flow freely from the tank to the burners, and the ignitor button creates a spark that lights the flame you’ll use to cook with. For propane and gas grills, you’ll likely need to turn at least one of the knobs (each knob corresponds to a burner) to high. Once on high, you’ll press and hold the ignitor button. You should hear a clicking followed by a whoosh (the gas igniting). Once you hear that whoosh, or see a flame, you can release the ignitor button. Keep the temperature on high, and fire up any other burners you plan to use. Additionally, close the lid and leave the grill for 10-15 minutes, or until your desired temperature is achieved.

How to Start a Charcoal Grill

Charcoal is going to be the most different. If you’re using coals deemed “match light” (check the bag), you should be able to simply light them with a match. Otherwise, you’ll need to add some lighter fluid to your coals before you introduce a flame. It’s important to heed any warnings on the charcoal and the lighter fluid when lighting your charcoal grill. Don’t use too much lighter fluid, and light your coals immediately after applying the fluid to them. Once the coals have a light gray ash to them, they’re ready to be spread around, and you’re ready to cook.


BBQ 101: How to Grill for Total Beginners

Even if we can’t end up throwing our usual Labor Day BBQ bash this year, we’re absolutely getting out in the yard (or on the patio) and grilling as much as we can before the weather turns. If you’re raring to go too but are new to the whole grilling thing, don’t worry—I’ll help you out with BBQ tips for this coming summer and beyond.

Before I proceed, I want to provide a bit of a disclaimer. Grilling, like all cooking, can be dangerous if you’re not comfortable with what you’re doing. When in doubt, consult your grill’s manual and always heed any safety warnings. While I can provide general advice based on my own grilling experience, I cannot speak to your particular equipment. Please be careful, and exercise caution when using a grill.

Identify Your Grill Type

BBQ Battle Gas vs Charcoal: Which Is Best? Hopefully I didn’t scare you off! I just want to make sure everyone is safe. If you’re still with me, the first thing to figure out is what type of grill you have access to. Typically, you’re dealing with gas, propane, electric, or charcoal. Curious about which one you have? The simplest one to identify is the electric grill. Why? Because they have cords that need to be plugged into outlets. If you have a grill that has a cord, you have an electric grill. Confident you don’t have an electric grill? Try looking beneath your grilling unit. If you see a tank, you likely have a propane grill. Don’t see a cord or a tank? Check the grill face. Do you see knobs and buttons? Then you probably have a gas grill. Different from the propane grill, these tap into your house’s natural gas supply, so you don’t have to worry about running out of cooking fuel like you do with propane. Lastly, if your grill is super basic—no knobs, no buttons—and looks like a hollowed-out drum, you likely have a charcoal grill.

In the market for a new grill? Check out CNET’s Best Grills for 2020.

Properly Prep Your Grill: Clean and Season

Once you figure out what kind of grill you have, you can start to prep it. The first step to any great grilling experience is to ensure your grill is clean. For steel or cast iron (non-coated) grates, use a stiff bristled steel brush to get any gunk, grime, or rust off. For porcelain-coated (or other non-stick coated) cast iron, use a nylon bristled brush to avoid scratching. Your grill may actually have a special tool that fits the contours of the grates. If it does, use that. Next, make sure the bottom of the grill is clear of any debris. Sometimes, things can get stuck and block the heat source. This is particularly common with charcoal grills as ash and coals from the last grill session could be left inside. Check out CNET’s guide on How to Clean Your Grill for more pointers.

GrillArt Grill Brush and Scraper, $19.50 from Amazon

Get that grill squeaky-clean.

Next, it’s time to season your grill grates (Note: Pre-seasoned, or porcelain/coated grates don’t need seasoning). This step helps create a non-stick cooking surface. Apply a thin, even layer of canola oil to the grates before turning on the heat. In my experience, the best way is to use something like Pam and spray it on, then wipe away any excess with a paper towel. Remember: A thin, even layer is what you’re going for. Too much oil will burn and create a buildup you don’t want!

Turn Up the Heat!

Now that your grill is clean and seasoned, you’ll have to ensure the fuel source is good to go. For gas grills, you need to make sure the valve on your gas line that allows gas to flow to your grill is open. Similarly, for propane grills, the top of the propane tank (underneath the grill) has a valve that needs to be opened (turned counterclockwise) to allow the propane to flow to the grill. For electric grills, just find an outlet, and plug it in. Finally, for charcoal grills, you need to add charcoal to the bottom of the grill (under the grate).

At this point, it’s time to preheat the grill. Just think about it like preheating an oven. Now, there are a lot of different grills out there, so your best bet is to find your grill’s manual and follow the instructions for starting it. A lot of manuals can even be found online nowadays. That being said, here are the basics.

How to Start an Electric Grill

Electric grills will typically have a knob to turn the grill on, and adjust the heat setting. If you have an electric grill, turn that knob to high, close the lid, and wait for your grill to reach your preferred cooking temperature. Unfortunately, it could take a while. Just be patient.

How to Start a Propane or Gas Grill

Propane and gas grills are similar, but a little more tricky. They have knobs too, but they also have ignitor buttons. The knobs let gas flow freely from the tank to the burners, and the ignitor button creates a spark that lights the flame you’ll use to cook with. For propane and gas grills, you’ll likely need to turn at least one of the knobs (each knob corresponds to a burner) to high. Once on high, you’ll press and hold the ignitor button. You should hear a clicking followed by a whoosh (the gas igniting). Once you hear that whoosh, or see a flame, you can release the ignitor button. Keep the temperature on high, and fire up any other burners you plan to use. Additionally, close the lid and leave the grill for 10-15 minutes, or until your desired temperature is achieved.

How to Start a Charcoal Grill

Charcoal is going to be the most different. If you’re using coals deemed “match light” (check the bag), you should be able to simply light them with a match. Otherwise, you’ll need to add some lighter fluid to your coals before you introduce a flame. It’s important to heed any warnings on the charcoal and the lighter fluid when lighting your charcoal grill. Don’t use too much lighter fluid, and light your coals immediately after applying the fluid to them. Once the coals have a light gray ash to them, they’re ready to be spread around, and you’re ready to cook.


BBQ 101: How to Grill for Total Beginners

Even if we can’t end up throwing our usual Labor Day BBQ bash this year, we’re absolutely getting out in the yard (or on the patio) and grilling as much as we can before the weather turns. If you’re raring to go too but are new to the whole grilling thing, don’t worry—I’ll help you out with BBQ tips for this coming summer and beyond.

Before I proceed, I want to provide a bit of a disclaimer. Grilling, like all cooking, can be dangerous if you’re not comfortable with what you’re doing. When in doubt, consult your grill’s manual and always heed any safety warnings. While I can provide general advice based on my own grilling experience, I cannot speak to your particular equipment. Please be careful, and exercise caution when using a grill.

Identify Your Grill Type

BBQ Battle Gas vs Charcoal: Which Is Best? Hopefully I didn’t scare you off! I just want to make sure everyone is safe. If you’re still with me, the first thing to figure out is what type of grill you have access to. Typically, you’re dealing with gas, propane, electric, or charcoal. Curious about which one you have? The simplest one to identify is the electric grill. Why? Because they have cords that need to be plugged into outlets. If you have a grill that has a cord, you have an electric grill. Confident you don’t have an electric grill? Try looking beneath your grilling unit. If you see a tank, you likely have a propane grill. Don’t see a cord or a tank? Check the grill face. Do you see knobs and buttons? Then you probably have a gas grill. Different from the propane grill, these tap into your house’s natural gas supply, so you don’t have to worry about running out of cooking fuel like you do with propane. Lastly, if your grill is super basic—no knobs, no buttons—and looks like a hollowed-out drum, you likely have a charcoal grill.

In the market for a new grill? Check out CNET’s Best Grills for 2020.

Properly Prep Your Grill: Clean and Season

Once you figure out what kind of grill you have, you can start to prep it. The first step to any great grilling experience is to ensure your grill is clean. For steel or cast iron (non-coated) grates, use a stiff bristled steel brush to get any gunk, grime, or rust off. For porcelain-coated (or other non-stick coated) cast iron, use a nylon bristled brush to avoid scratching. Your grill may actually have a special tool that fits the contours of the grates. If it does, use that. Next, make sure the bottom of the grill is clear of any debris. Sometimes, things can get stuck and block the heat source. This is particularly common with charcoal grills as ash and coals from the last grill session could be left inside. Check out CNET’s guide on How to Clean Your Grill for more pointers.

GrillArt Grill Brush and Scraper, $19.50 from Amazon

Get that grill squeaky-clean.

Next, it’s time to season your grill grates (Note: Pre-seasoned, or porcelain/coated grates don’t need seasoning). This step helps create a non-stick cooking surface. Apply a thin, even layer of canola oil to the grates before turning on the heat. In my experience, the best way is to use something like Pam and spray it on, then wipe away any excess with a paper towel. Remember: A thin, even layer is what you’re going for. Too much oil will burn and create a buildup you don’t want!

Turn Up the Heat!

Now that your grill is clean and seasoned, you’ll have to ensure the fuel source is good to go. For gas grills, you need to make sure the valve on your gas line that allows gas to flow to your grill is open. Similarly, for propane grills, the top of the propane tank (underneath the grill) has a valve that needs to be opened (turned counterclockwise) to allow the propane to flow to the grill. For electric grills, just find an outlet, and plug it in. Finally, for charcoal grills, you need to add charcoal to the bottom of the grill (under the grate).

At this point, it’s time to preheat the grill. Just think about it like preheating an oven. Now, there are a lot of different grills out there, so your best bet is to find your grill’s manual and follow the instructions for starting it. A lot of manuals can even be found online nowadays. That being said, here are the basics.

How to Start an Electric Grill

Electric grills will typically have a knob to turn the grill on, and adjust the heat setting. If you have an electric grill, turn that knob to high, close the lid, and wait for your grill to reach your preferred cooking temperature. Unfortunately, it could take a while. Just be patient.

How to Start a Propane or Gas Grill

Propane and gas grills are similar, but a little more tricky. They have knobs too, but they also have ignitor buttons. The knobs let gas flow freely from the tank to the burners, and the ignitor button creates a spark that lights the flame you’ll use to cook with. For propane and gas grills, you’ll likely need to turn at least one of the knobs (each knob corresponds to a burner) to high. Once on high, you’ll press and hold the ignitor button. You should hear a clicking followed by a whoosh (the gas igniting). Once you hear that whoosh, or see a flame, you can release the ignitor button. Keep the temperature on high, and fire up any other burners you plan to use. Additionally, close the lid and leave the grill for 10-15 minutes, or until your desired temperature is achieved.

How to Start a Charcoal Grill

Charcoal is going to be the most different. If you’re using coals deemed “match light” (check the bag), you should be able to simply light them with a match. Otherwise, you’ll need to add some lighter fluid to your coals before you introduce a flame. It’s important to heed any warnings on the charcoal and the lighter fluid when lighting your charcoal grill. Don’t use too much lighter fluid, and light your coals immediately after applying the fluid to them. Once the coals have a light gray ash to them, they’re ready to be spread around, and you’re ready to cook.


BBQ 101: How to Grill for Total Beginners

Even if we can’t end up throwing our usual Labor Day BBQ bash this year, we’re absolutely getting out in the yard (or on the patio) and grilling as much as we can before the weather turns. If you’re raring to go too but are new to the whole grilling thing, don’t worry—I’ll help you out with BBQ tips for this coming summer and beyond.

Before I proceed, I want to provide a bit of a disclaimer. Grilling, like all cooking, can be dangerous if you’re not comfortable with what you’re doing. When in doubt, consult your grill’s manual and always heed any safety warnings. While I can provide general advice based on my own grilling experience, I cannot speak to your particular equipment. Please be careful, and exercise caution when using a grill.

Identify Your Grill Type

BBQ Battle Gas vs Charcoal: Which Is Best? Hopefully I didn’t scare you off! I just want to make sure everyone is safe. If you’re still with me, the first thing to figure out is what type of grill you have access to. Typically, you’re dealing with gas, propane, electric, or charcoal. Curious about which one you have? The simplest one to identify is the electric grill. Why? Because they have cords that need to be plugged into outlets. If you have a grill that has a cord, you have an electric grill. Confident you don’t have an electric grill? Try looking beneath your grilling unit. If you see a tank, you likely have a propane grill. Don’t see a cord or a tank? Check the grill face. Do you see knobs and buttons? Then you probably have a gas grill. Different from the propane grill, these tap into your house’s natural gas supply, so you don’t have to worry about running out of cooking fuel like you do with propane. Lastly, if your grill is super basic—no knobs, no buttons—and looks like a hollowed-out drum, you likely have a charcoal grill.

In the market for a new grill? Check out CNET’s Best Grills for 2020.

Properly Prep Your Grill: Clean and Season

Once you figure out what kind of grill you have, you can start to prep it. The first step to any great grilling experience is to ensure your grill is clean. For steel or cast iron (non-coated) grates, use a stiff bristled steel brush to get any gunk, grime, or rust off. For porcelain-coated (or other non-stick coated) cast iron, use a nylon bristled brush to avoid scratching. Your grill may actually have a special tool that fits the contours of the grates. If it does, use that. Next, make sure the bottom of the grill is clear of any debris. Sometimes, things can get stuck and block the heat source. This is particularly common with charcoal grills as ash and coals from the last grill session could be left inside. Check out CNET’s guide on How to Clean Your Grill for more pointers.

GrillArt Grill Brush and Scraper, $19.50 from Amazon

Get that grill squeaky-clean.

Next, it’s time to season your grill grates (Note: Pre-seasoned, or porcelain/coated grates don’t need seasoning). This step helps create a non-stick cooking surface. Apply a thin, even layer of canola oil to the grates before turning on the heat. In my experience, the best way is to use something like Pam and spray it on, then wipe away any excess with a paper towel. Remember: A thin, even layer is what you’re going for. Too much oil will burn and create a buildup you don’t want!

Turn Up the Heat!

Now that your grill is clean and seasoned, you’ll have to ensure the fuel source is good to go. For gas grills, you need to make sure the valve on your gas line that allows gas to flow to your grill is open. Similarly, for propane grills, the top of the propane tank (underneath the grill) has a valve that needs to be opened (turned counterclockwise) to allow the propane to flow to the grill. For electric grills, just find an outlet, and plug it in. Finally, for charcoal grills, you need to add charcoal to the bottom of the grill (under the grate).

At this point, it’s time to preheat the grill. Just think about it like preheating an oven. Now, there are a lot of different grills out there, so your best bet is to find your grill’s manual and follow the instructions for starting it. A lot of manuals can even be found online nowadays. That being said, here are the basics.

How to Start an Electric Grill

Electric grills will typically have a knob to turn the grill on, and adjust the heat setting. If you have an electric grill, turn that knob to high, close the lid, and wait for your grill to reach your preferred cooking temperature. Unfortunately, it could take a while. Just be patient.

How to Start a Propane or Gas Grill

Propane and gas grills are similar, but a little more tricky. They have knobs too, but they also have ignitor buttons. The knobs let gas flow freely from the tank to the burners, and the ignitor button creates a spark that lights the flame you’ll use to cook with. For propane and gas grills, you’ll likely need to turn at least one of the knobs (each knob corresponds to a burner) to high. Once on high, you’ll press and hold the ignitor button. You should hear a clicking followed by a whoosh (the gas igniting). Once you hear that whoosh, or see a flame, you can release the ignitor button. Keep the temperature on high, and fire up any other burners you plan to use. Additionally, close the lid and leave the grill for 10-15 minutes, or until your desired temperature is achieved.

How to Start a Charcoal Grill

Charcoal is going to be the most different. If you’re using coals deemed “match light” (check the bag), you should be able to simply light them with a match. Otherwise, you’ll need to add some lighter fluid to your coals before you introduce a flame. It’s important to heed any warnings on the charcoal and the lighter fluid when lighting your charcoal grill. Don’t use too much lighter fluid, and light your coals immediately after applying the fluid to them. Once the coals have a light gray ash to them, they’re ready to be spread around, and you’re ready to cook.


BBQ 101: How to Grill for Total Beginners

Even if we can’t end up throwing our usual Labor Day BBQ bash this year, we’re absolutely getting out in the yard (or on the patio) and grilling as much as we can before the weather turns. If you’re raring to go too but are new to the whole grilling thing, don’t worry—I’ll help you out with BBQ tips for this coming summer and beyond.

Before I proceed, I want to provide a bit of a disclaimer. Grilling, like all cooking, can be dangerous if you’re not comfortable with what you’re doing. When in doubt, consult your grill’s manual and always heed any safety warnings. While I can provide general advice based on my own grilling experience, I cannot speak to your particular equipment. Please be careful, and exercise caution when using a grill.

Identify Your Grill Type

BBQ Battle Gas vs Charcoal: Which Is Best? Hopefully I didn’t scare you off! I just want to make sure everyone is safe. If you’re still with me, the first thing to figure out is what type of grill you have access to. Typically, you’re dealing with gas, propane, electric, or charcoal. Curious about which one you have? The simplest one to identify is the electric grill. Why? Because they have cords that need to be plugged into outlets. If you have a grill that has a cord, you have an electric grill. Confident you don’t have an electric grill? Try looking beneath your grilling unit. If you see a tank, you likely have a propane grill. Don’t see a cord or a tank? Check the grill face. Do you see knobs and buttons? Then you probably have a gas grill. Different from the propane grill, these tap into your house’s natural gas supply, so you don’t have to worry about running out of cooking fuel like you do with propane. Lastly, if your grill is super basic—no knobs, no buttons—and looks like a hollowed-out drum, you likely have a charcoal grill.

In the market for a new grill? Check out CNET’s Best Grills for 2020.

Properly Prep Your Grill: Clean and Season

Once you figure out what kind of grill you have, you can start to prep it. The first step to any great grilling experience is to ensure your grill is clean. For steel or cast iron (non-coated) grates, use a stiff bristled steel brush to get any gunk, grime, or rust off. For porcelain-coated (or other non-stick coated) cast iron, use a nylon bristled brush to avoid scratching. Your grill may actually have a special tool that fits the contours of the grates. If it does, use that. Next, make sure the bottom of the grill is clear of any debris. Sometimes, things can get stuck and block the heat source. This is particularly common with charcoal grills as ash and coals from the last grill session could be left inside. Check out CNET’s guide on How to Clean Your Grill for more pointers.

GrillArt Grill Brush and Scraper, $19.50 from Amazon

Get that grill squeaky-clean.

Next, it’s time to season your grill grates (Note: Pre-seasoned, or porcelain/coated grates don’t need seasoning). This step helps create a non-stick cooking surface. Apply a thin, even layer of canola oil to the grates before turning on the heat. In my experience, the best way is to use something like Pam and spray it on, then wipe away any excess with a paper towel. Remember: A thin, even layer is what you’re going for. Too much oil will burn and create a buildup you don’t want!

Turn Up the Heat!

Now that your grill is clean and seasoned, you’ll have to ensure the fuel source is good to go. For gas grills, you need to make sure the valve on your gas line that allows gas to flow to your grill is open. Similarly, for propane grills, the top of the propane tank (underneath the grill) has a valve that needs to be opened (turned counterclockwise) to allow the propane to flow to the grill. For electric grills, just find an outlet, and plug it in. Finally, for charcoal grills, you need to add charcoal to the bottom of the grill (under the grate).

At this point, it’s time to preheat the grill. Just think about it like preheating an oven. Now, there are a lot of different grills out there, so your best bet is to find your grill’s manual and follow the instructions for starting it. A lot of manuals can even be found online nowadays. That being said, here are the basics.

How to Start an Electric Grill

Electric grills will typically have a knob to turn the grill on, and adjust the heat setting. If you have an electric grill, turn that knob to high, close the lid, and wait for your grill to reach your preferred cooking temperature. Unfortunately, it could take a while. Just be patient.

How to Start a Propane or Gas Grill

Propane and gas grills are similar, but a little more tricky. They have knobs too, but they also have ignitor buttons. The knobs let gas flow freely from the tank to the burners, and the ignitor button creates a spark that lights the flame you’ll use to cook with. For propane and gas grills, you’ll likely need to turn at least one of the knobs (each knob corresponds to a burner) to high. Once on high, you’ll press and hold the ignitor button. You should hear a clicking followed by a whoosh (the gas igniting). Once you hear that whoosh, or see a flame, you can release the ignitor button. Keep the temperature on high, and fire up any other burners you plan to use. Additionally, close the lid and leave the grill for 10-15 minutes, or until your desired temperature is achieved.

How to Start a Charcoal Grill

Charcoal is going to be the most different. If you’re using coals deemed “match light” (check the bag), you should be able to simply light them with a match. Otherwise, you’ll need to add some lighter fluid to your coals before you introduce a flame. It’s important to heed any warnings on the charcoal and the lighter fluid when lighting your charcoal grill. Don’t use too much lighter fluid, and light your coals immediately after applying the fluid to them. Once the coals have a light gray ash to them, they’re ready to be spread around, and you’re ready to cook.


BBQ 101: How to Grill for Total Beginners

Even if we can’t end up throwing our usual Labor Day BBQ bash this year, we’re absolutely getting out in the yard (or on the patio) and grilling as much as we can before the weather turns. If you’re raring to go too but are new to the whole grilling thing, don’t worry—I’ll help you out with BBQ tips for this coming summer and beyond.

Before I proceed, I want to provide a bit of a disclaimer. Grilling, like all cooking, can be dangerous if you’re not comfortable with what you’re doing. When in doubt, consult your grill’s manual and always heed any safety warnings. While I can provide general advice based on my own grilling experience, I cannot speak to your particular equipment. Please be careful, and exercise caution when using a grill.

Identify Your Grill Type

BBQ Battle Gas vs Charcoal: Which Is Best? Hopefully I didn’t scare you off! I just want to make sure everyone is safe. If you’re still with me, the first thing to figure out is what type of grill you have access to. Typically, you’re dealing with gas, propane, electric, or charcoal. Curious about which one you have? The simplest one to identify is the electric grill. Why? Because they have cords that need to be plugged into outlets. If you have a grill that has a cord, you have an electric grill. Confident you don’t have an electric grill? Try looking beneath your grilling unit. If you see a tank, you likely have a propane grill. Don’t see a cord or a tank? Check the grill face. Do you see knobs and buttons? Then you probably have a gas grill. Different from the propane grill, these tap into your house’s natural gas supply, so you don’t have to worry about running out of cooking fuel like you do with propane. Lastly, if your grill is super basic—no knobs, no buttons—and looks like a hollowed-out drum, you likely have a charcoal grill.

In the market for a new grill? Check out CNET’s Best Grills for 2020.

Properly Prep Your Grill: Clean and Season

Once you figure out what kind of grill you have, you can start to prep it. The first step to any great grilling experience is to ensure your grill is clean. For steel or cast iron (non-coated) grates, use a stiff bristled steel brush to get any gunk, grime, or rust off. For porcelain-coated (or other non-stick coated) cast iron, use a nylon bristled brush to avoid scratching. Your grill may actually have a special tool that fits the contours of the grates. If it does, use that. Next, make sure the bottom of the grill is clear of any debris. Sometimes, things can get stuck and block the heat source. This is particularly common with charcoal grills as ash and coals from the last grill session could be left inside. Check out CNET’s guide on How to Clean Your Grill for more pointers.

GrillArt Grill Brush and Scraper, $19.50 from Amazon

Get that grill squeaky-clean.

Next, it’s time to season your grill grates (Note: Pre-seasoned, or porcelain/coated grates don’t need seasoning). This step helps create a non-stick cooking surface. Apply a thin, even layer of canola oil to the grates before turning on the heat. In my experience, the best way is to use something like Pam and spray it on, then wipe away any excess with a paper towel. Remember: A thin, even layer is what you’re going for. Too much oil will burn and create a buildup you don’t want!

Turn Up the Heat!

Now that your grill is clean and seasoned, you’ll have to ensure the fuel source is good to go. For gas grills, you need to make sure the valve on your gas line that allows gas to flow to your grill is open. Similarly, for propane grills, the top of the propane tank (underneath the grill) has a valve that needs to be opened (turned counterclockwise) to allow the propane to flow to the grill. For electric grills, just find an outlet, and plug it in. Finally, for charcoal grills, you need to add charcoal to the bottom of the grill (under the grate).

At this point, it’s time to preheat the grill. Just think about it like preheating an oven. Now, there are a lot of different grills out there, so your best bet is to find your grill’s manual and follow the instructions for starting it. A lot of manuals can even be found online nowadays. That being said, here are the basics.

How to Start an Electric Grill

Electric grills will typically have a knob to turn the grill on, and adjust the heat setting. If you have an electric grill, turn that knob to high, close the lid, and wait for your grill to reach your preferred cooking temperature. Unfortunately, it could take a while. Just be patient.

How to Start a Propane or Gas Grill

Propane and gas grills are similar, but a little more tricky. They have knobs too, but they also have ignitor buttons. The knobs let gas flow freely from the tank to the burners, and the ignitor button creates a spark that lights the flame you’ll use to cook with. For propane and gas grills, you’ll likely need to turn at least one of the knobs (each knob corresponds to a burner) to high. Once on high, you’ll press and hold the ignitor button. You should hear a clicking followed by a whoosh (the gas igniting). Once you hear that whoosh, or see a flame, you can release the ignitor button. Keep the temperature on high, and fire up any other burners you plan to use. Additionally, close the lid and leave the grill for 10-15 minutes, or until your desired temperature is achieved.

How to Start a Charcoal Grill

Charcoal is going to be the most different. If you’re using coals deemed “match light” (check the bag), you should be able to simply light them with a match. Otherwise, you’ll need to add some lighter fluid to your coals before you introduce a flame. It’s important to heed any warnings on the charcoal and the lighter fluid when lighting your charcoal grill. Don’t use too much lighter fluid, and light your coals immediately after applying the fluid to them. Once the coals have a light gray ash to them, they’re ready to be spread around, and you’re ready to cook.


BBQ 101: How to Grill for Total Beginners

Even if we can’t end up throwing our usual Labor Day BBQ bash this year, we’re absolutely getting out in the yard (or on the patio) and grilling as much as we can before the weather turns. If you’re raring to go too but are new to the whole grilling thing, don’t worry—I’ll help you out with BBQ tips for this coming summer and beyond.

Before I proceed, I want to provide a bit of a disclaimer. Grilling, like all cooking, can be dangerous if you’re not comfortable with what you’re doing. When in doubt, consult your grill’s manual and always heed any safety warnings. While I can provide general advice based on my own grilling experience, I cannot speak to your particular equipment. Please be careful, and exercise caution when using a grill.

Identify Your Grill Type

BBQ Battle Gas vs Charcoal: Which Is Best? Hopefully I didn’t scare you off! I just want to make sure everyone is safe. If you’re still with me, the first thing to figure out is what type of grill you have access to. Typically, you’re dealing with gas, propane, electric, or charcoal. Curious about which one you have? The simplest one to identify is the electric grill. Why? Because they have cords that need to be plugged into outlets. If you have a grill that has a cord, you have an electric grill. Confident you don’t have an electric grill? Try looking beneath your grilling unit. If you see a tank, you likely have a propane grill. Don’t see a cord or a tank? Check the grill face. Do you see knobs and buttons? Then you probably have a gas grill. Different from the propane grill, these tap into your house’s natural gas supply, so you don’t have to worry about running out of cooking fuel like you do with propane. Lastly, if your grill is super basic—no knobs, no buttons—and looks like a hollowed-out drum, you likely have a charcoal grill.

In the market for a new grill? Check out CNET’s Best Grills for 2020.

Properly Prep Your Grill: Clean and Season

Once you figure out what kind of grill you have, you can start to prep it. The first step to any great grilling experience is to ensure your grill is clean. For steel or cast iron (non-coated) grates, use a stiff bristled steel brush to get any gunk, grime, or rust off. For porcelain-coated (or other non-stick coated) cast iron, use a nylon bristled brush to avoid scratching. Your grill may actually have a special tool that fits the contours of the grates. If it does, use that. Next, make sure the bottom of the grill is clear of any debris. Sometimes, things can get stuck and block the heat source. This is particularly common with charcoal grills as ash and coals from the last grill session could be left inside. Check out CNET’s guide on How to Clean Your Grill for more pointers.

GrillArt Grill Brush and Scraper, $19.50 from Amazon

Get that grill squeaky-clean.

Next, it’s time to season your grill grates (Note: Pre-seasoned, or porcelain/coated grates don’t need seasoning). This step helps create a non-stick cooking surface. Apply a thin, even layer of canola oil to the grates before turning on the heat. In my experience, the best way is to use something like Pam and spray it on, then wipe away any excess with a paper towel. Remember: A thin, even layer is what you’re going for. Too much oil will burn and create a buildup you don’t want!

Turn Up the Heat!

Now that your grill is clean and seasoned, you’ll have to ensure the fuel source is good to go. For gas grills, you need to make sure the valve on your gas line that allows gas to flow to your grill is open. Similarly, for propane grills, the top of the propane tank (underneath the grill) has a valve that needs to be opened (turned counterclockwise) to allow the propane to flow to the grill. For electric grills, just find an outlet, and plug it in. Finally, for charcoal grills, you need to add charcoal to the bottom of the grill (under the grate).

At this point, it’s time to preheat the grill. Just think about it like preheating an oven. Now, there are a lot of different grills out there, so your best bet is to find your grill’s manual and follow the instructions for starting it. A lot of manuals can even be found online nowadays. That being said, here are the basics.

How to Start an Electric Grill

Electric grills will typically have a knob to turn the grill on, and adjust the heat setting. If you have an electric grill, turn that knob to high, close the lid, and wait for your grill to reach your preferred cooking temperature. Unfortunately, it could take a while. Just be patient.

How to Start a Propane or Gas Grill

Propane and gas grills are similar, but a little more tricky. They have knobs too, but they also have ignitor buttons. The knobs let gas flow freely from the tank to the burners, and the ignitor button creates a spark that lights the flame you’ll use to cook with. For propane and gas grills, you’ll likely need to turn at least one of the knobs (each knob corresponds to a burner) to high. Once on high, you’ll press and hold the ignitor button. You should hear a clicking followed by a whoosh (the gas igniting). Once you hear that whoosh, or see a flame, you can release the ignitor button. Keep the temperature on high, and fire up any other burners you plan to use. Additionally, close the lid and leave the grill for 10-15 minutes, or until your desired temperature is achieved.

How to Start a Charcoal Grill

Charcoal is going to be the most different. If you’re using coals deemed “match light” (check the bag), you should be able to simply light them with a match. Otherwise, you’ll need to add some lighter fluid to your coals before you introduce a flame. It’s important to heed any warnings on the charcoal and the lighter fluid when lighting your charcoal grill. Don’t use too much lighter fluid, and light your coals immediately after applying the fluid to them. Once the coals have a light gray ash to them, they’re ready to be spread around, and you’re ready to cook.


BBQ 101: How to Grill for Total Beginners

Even if we can’t end up throwing our usual Labor Day BBQ bash this year, we’re absolutely getting out in the yard (or on the patio) and grilling as much as we can before the weather turns. If you’re raring to go too but are new to the whole grilling thing, don’t worry—I’ll help you out with BBQ tips for this coming summer and beyond.

Before I proceed, I want to provide a bit of a disclaimer. Grilling, like all cooking, can be dangerous if you’re not comfortable with what you’re doing. When in doubt, consult your grill’s manual and always heed any safety warnings. While I can provide general advice based on my own grilling experience, I cannot speak to your particular equipment. Please be careful, and exercise caution when using a grill.

Identify Your Grill Type

BBQ Battle Gas vs Charcoal: Which Is Best? Hopefully I didn’t scare you off! I just want to make sure everyone is safe. If you’re still with me, the first thing to figure out is what type of grill you have access to. Typically, you’re dealing with gas, propane, electric, or charcoal. Curious about which one you have? The simplest one to identify is the electric grill. Why? Because they have cords that need to be plugged into outlets. If you have a grill that has a cord, you have an electric grill. Confident you don’t have an electric grill? Try looking beneath your grilling unit. If you see a tank, you likely have a propane grill. Don’t see a cord or a tank? Check the grill face. Do you see knobs and buttons? Then you probably have a gas grill. Different from the propane grill, these tap into your house’s natural gas supply, so you don’t have to worry about running out of cooking fuel like you do with propane. Lastly, if your grill is super basic—no knobs, no buttons—and looks like a hollowed-out drum, you likely have a charcoal grill.

In the market for a new grill? Check out CNET’s Best Grills for 2020.

Properly Prep Your Grill: Clean and Season

Once you figure out what kind of grill you have, you can start to prep it. The first step to any great grilling experience is to ensure your grill is clean. For steel or cast iron (non-coated) grates, use a stiff bristled steel brush to get any gunk, grime, or rust off. For porcelain-coated (or other non-stick coated) cast iron, use a nylon bristled brush to avoid scratching. Your grill may actually have a special tool that fits the contours of the grates. If it does, use that. Next, make sure the bottom of the grill is clear of any debris. Sometimes, things can get stuck and block the heat source. This is particularly common with charcoal grills as ash and coals from the last grill session could be left inside. Check out CNET’s guide on How to Clean Your Grill for more pointers.

GrillArt Grill Brush and Scraper, $19.50 from Amazon

Get that grill squeaky-clean.

Next, it’s time to season your grill grates (Note: Pre-seasoned, or porcelain/coated grates don’t need seasoning). This step helps create a non-stick cooking surface. Apply a thin, even layer of canola oil to the grates before turning on the heat. In my experience, the best way is to use something like Pam and spray it on, then wipe away any excess with a paper towel. Remember: A thin, even layer is what you’re going for. Too much oil will burn and create a buildup you don’t want!

Turn Up the Heat!

Now that your grill is clean and seasoned, you’ll have to ensure the fuel source is good to go. For gas grills, you need to make sure the valve on your gas line that allows gas to flow to your grill is open. Similarly, for propane grills, the top of the propane tank (underneath the grill) has a valve that needs to be opened (turned counterclockwise) to allow the propane to flow to the grill. For electric grills, just find an outlet, and plug it in. Finally, for charcoal grills, you need to add charcoal to the bottom of the grill (under the grate).

At this point, it’s time to preheat the grill. Just think about it like preheating an oven. Now, there are a lot of different grills out there, so your best bet is to find your grill’s manual and follow the instructions for starting it. A lot of manuals can even be found online nowadays. That being said, here are the basics.

How to Start an Electric Grill

Electric grills will typically have a knob to turn the grill on, and adjust the heat setting. If you have an electric grill, turn that knob to high, close the lid, and wait for your grill to reach your preferred cooking temperature. Unfortunately, it could take a while. Just be patient.

How to Start a Propane or Gas Grill

Propane and gas grills are similar, but a little more tricky. They have knobs too, but they also have ignitor buttons. The knobs let gas flow freely from the tank to the burners, and the ignitor button creates a spark that lights the flame you’ll use to cook with. For propane and gas grills, you’ll likely need to turn at least one of the knobs (each knob corresponds to a burner) to high. Once on high, you’ll press and hold the ignitor button. You should hear a clicking followed by a whoosh (the gas igniting). Once you hear that whoosh, or see a flame, you can release the ignitor button. Keep the temperature on high, and fire up any other burners you plan to use. Additionally, close the lid and leave the grill for 10-15 minutes, or until your desired temperature is achieved.

How to Start a Charcoal Grill

Charcoal is going to be the most different. If you’re using coals deemed “match light” (check the bag), you should be able to simply light them with a match. Otherwise, you’ll need to add some lighter fluid to your coals before you introduce a flame. It’s important to heed any warnings on the charcoal and the lighter fluid when lighting your charcoal grill. Don’t use too much lighter fluid, and light your coals immediately after applying the fluid to them. Once the coals have a light gray ash to them, they’re ready to be spread around, and you’re ready to cook.


BBQ 101: How to Grill for Total Beginners

Even if we can’t end up throwing our usual Labor Day BBQ bash this year, we’re absolutely getting out in the yard (or on the patio) and grilling as much as we can before the weather turns. If you’re raring to go too but are new to the whole grilling thing, don’t worry—I’ll help you out with BBQ tips for this coming summer and beyond.

Before I proceed, I want to provide a bit of a disclaimer. Grilling, like all cooking, can be dangerous if you’re not comfortable with what you’re doing. When in doubt, consult your grill’s manual and always heed any safety warnings. While I can provide general advice based on my own grilling experience, I cannot speak to your particular equipment. Please be careful, and exercise caution when using a grill.

Identify Your Grill Type

BBQ Battle Gas vs Charcoal: Which Is Best? Hopefully I didn’t scare you off! I just want to make sure everyone is safe. If you’re still with me, the first thing to figure out is what type of grill you have access to. Typically, you’re dealing with gas, propane, electric, or charcoal. Curious about which one you have? The simplest one to identify is the electric grill. Why? Because they have cords that need to be plugged into outlets. If you have a grill that has a cord, you have an electric grill. Confident you don’t have an electric grill? Try looking beneath your grilling unit. If you see a tank, you likely have a propane grill. Don’t see a cord or a tank? Check the grill face. Do you see knobs and buttons? Then you probably have a gas grill. Different from the propane grill, these tap into your house’s natural gas supply, so you don’t have to worry about running out of cooking fuel like you do with propane. Lastly, if your grill is super basic—no knobs, no buttons—and looks like a hollowed-out drum, you likely have a charcoal grill.

In the market for a new grill? Check out CNET’s Best Grills for 2020.

Properly Prep Your Grill: Clean and Season

Once you figure out what kind of grill you have, you can start to prep it. The first step to any great grilling experience is to ensure your grill is clean. For steel or cast iron (non-coated) grates, use a stiff bristled steel brush to get any gunk, grime, or rust off. For porcelain-coated (or other non-stick coated) cast iron, use a nylon bristled brush to avoid scratching. Your grill may actually have a special tool that fits the contours of the grates. If it does, use that. Next, make sure the bottom of the grill is clear of any debris. Sometimes, things can get stuck and block the heat source. This is particularly common with charcoal grills as ash and coals from the last grill session could be left inside. Check out CNET’s guide on How to Clean Your Grill for more pointers.

GrillArt Grill Brush and Scraper, $19.50 from Amazon

Get that grill squeaky-clean.

Next, it’s time to season your grill grates (Note: Pre-seasoned, or porcelain/coated grates don’t need seasoning). This step helps create a non-stick cooking surface. Apply a thin, even layer of canola oil to the grates before turning on the heat. In my experience, the best way is to use something like Pam and spray it on, then wipe away any excess with a paper towel. Remember: A thin, even layer is what you’re going for. Too much oil will burn and create a buildup you don’t want!

Turn Up the Heat!

Now that your grill is clean and seasoned, you’ll have to ensure the fuel source is good to go. For gas grills, you need to make sure the valve on your gas line that allows gas to flow to your grill is open. Similarly, for propane grills, the top of the propane tank (underneath the grill) has a valve that needs to be opened (turned counterclockwise) to allow the propane to flow to the grill. For electric grills, just find an outlet, and plug it in. Finally, for charcoal grills, you need to add charcoal to the bottom of the grill (under the grate).

At this point, it’s time to preheat the grill. Just think about it like preheating an oven. Now, there are a lot of different grills out there, so your best bet is to find your grill’s manual and follow the instructions for starting it. A lot of manuals can even be found online nowadays. That being said, here are the basics.

How to Start an Electric Grill

Electric grills will typically have a knob to turn the grill on, and adjust the heat setting. If you have an electric grill, turn that knob to high, close the lid, and wait for your grill to reach your preferred cooking temperature. Unfortunately, it could take a while. Just be patient.

How to Start a Propane or Gas Grill

Propane and gas grills are similar, but a little more tricky. They have knobs too, but they also have ignitor buttons. The knobs let gas flow freely from the tank to the burners, and the ignitor button creates a spark that lights the flame you’ll use to cook with. For propane and gas grills, you’ll likely need to turn at least one of the knobs (each knob corresponds to a burner) to high. Once on high, you’ll press and hold the ignitor button. You should hear a clicking followed by a whoosh (the gas igniting). Once you hear that whoosh, or see a flame, you can release the ignitor button. Keep the temperature on high, and fire up any other burners you plan to use. Additionally, close the lid and leave the grill for 10-15 minutes, or until your desired temperature is achieved.

How to Start a Charcoal Grill

Charcoal is going to be the most different. If you’re using coals deemed “match light” (check the bag), you should be able to simply light them with a match. Otherwise, you’ll need to add some lighter fluid to your coals before you introduce a flame. It’s important to heed any warnings on the charcoal and the lighter fluid when lighting your charcoal grill. Don’t use too much lighter fluid, and light your coals immediately after applying the fluid to them. Once the coals have a light gray ash to them, they’re ready to be spread around, and you’re ready to cook.


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